Thrash Hits

April 18th, 2013

Album: Drowning Pool – Resilience

Drowning Pool 2013 promo photo Thrash Hits

Drowning Pool
Resilience
EMI
09 April 2013

by Tom Dare

It’s easy to be an elitist dickhead. You pre-order everything Profound Lore put out, pretend Nuclear War Now is your favourite label and never let anyone know that you secretly love that one song by SOiL everyone knows. But sometimes, much as you hate to admit it, something comes along that makes your narrow-minded viewpoint understandable. Right on cue: Drowning Pool.

Drowning Pool Resilience album cover artwork packshot 400px Thrash Hits

Almost every metal between the ages of 25 and 35 who says they never threw down to ‘Break Stuff‘ is a liar – and the same goes for ‘Bodies‘, for that matter. But generally, that shit died a death a long time ago, and with good reason: Like every other style of music, most of it simply sucked. In its wake it has left a trail of defunct bands and cynical nostalgia boats, along with the occasional band that’s justified their continued existence by changing and writing better songs.

Which makes it truly bizarre that a band as lacking in songwriting talent as Drowning Pool are not just still around, but allowed near a recording studio. This is Drowning Pool album number five (five… there are five Drowning Pool albums. I’ll let that thought fester for a second), and it’s so glossy and polished it thinks the sun shines out of its arse. In truth, what’s coming out of there is much less wholesome.

Resilience is nostalgic for all the wrong things. It likes the shit bits of nu metal, like Five Finger Death Punch without the fun (which is a bit like saying someone is Five Finger Death Punch without the brains, Emmure without the variety, or Five Finger Death Punch without the progression). Even when there is the occasional flash in the first half that tries to justify this puddle of diarrhoea, it manages to be utterly grimace-inducing. It swipes a few ideas from the crappiest hair metal, ‘Saturday Night‘ sounding like a bad Mötley Crüe tribute act tried to update their sound to appeal to fifteen-year-olds in 2002. And this is the better half of the album.

Watch the video to ‘Saturday Night’ by Drowning Pool:

Then we get to the second half of the record and it’s time to flush. ‘Life Of Misery’ tries to go self-righteous and defiant, and ends up sounding like a teenager who’s just had his World Of Warcraft subscription cancelled. The lyrics are clunkier than the gearbox on an Austin Maestro with 253,716 miles on the clock, and the piss-poor attempt at gruff singing can’t cover up how rancidly out of place the pop-punk melody in the chorus sounds.

You can go on picking faults in Resilience – it is truly dreadful – but it’s really not worth getting cross about. It perpetuates all the things that were bad about the pre-Killswitch era. It’s vacuous, shallow and not worth your attention. If it was worth getting worked up about it, it’d  be enough to make you want to go on some Stalinist metal purge, with this the first record sent  to rot in some Gulag in the Shetlands.

1/6

Sounds like: 2001 taking a runny poo in your ear
Stand-out shit tracks: Life Of Misery, Skip To The End


Comments

  • asdf

    i saw Drowning Pool at the House of Blues Anahiem like 2 months ago and can safely say that people were getting pissed at me for trying to start a mosh pit to Bodies hahaha!

  • Chris Speak

    I have to agree with this review wholeheartedly. I grew up in the age of Drowning Pool, Linkin Park and the like (My first foray into none-mainstream was the likes of The Offspring’s ‘Ixnay on the Hombre’ and Marilyn Manson’s ‘Mechanical Animals’ back in 1998 at the tender age of 14…), but that music really did die a death because the bands worth listening to adapted their style and moved on. Disturbed, Papa Roach and a few others have all moved on, adapted and thrived.

    Drowning Pool clearly didn’t.

    The sad thing is they probably would have changed if Dave Williams hadn’t died, and it could have been for the better.

    The sad reality is Resilience is a terrible album full of generic early 2000s Nu-metal, awful lyrics, sub-par whiney vocals reminiscent of a My Chemical Romance album and the song mentioned above (‘Life of Misery’) is sadly the best song on the CD as it was the only one that stood out to me as being even half-decent and original.

    The saddest irony is that they wrote the track “In Memory Of…” for Dave Williams on the 10th anniversary of his death, and a more fitting tribute would have been to simply not release this CD.

    1/6 is generous. Do not buy.

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